Styling Coloured Leggings

Styling leggings -3 Ways
Click on image to see outfit details.

My fleece lined leggings arrived from Aenlley via Amazon today and I couldn’t be happier. I got 4 colours, cranberry, khaki, grey and black so I am going to have lots of fun trying them with different outfits. They are warm and high-waisted and are long enough to go right down to my feet. They are definitely not tights though so they would not work with refined looking dresses. Because they are chunkier, they will look great with a more substantial shoe, hence why I styled all the outfits above with boots or boot type shoes. I have kept the tops long to cover to at least mid-thigh as unless you are perfect in these areas, leggings are pretty unforgiving. The looks I have created above will work for most figure types but you may consider belting the poncho or the black tunic dress if its all looking a bit volumous ( Not sure if this is an official word but it makes perfect sense to me!). Anyways I need to get myself off to bed here so I hope you have happy dreams about all sorts of wonderful things to do with coloured leggings:)

Using colour to your advantage at work

Ways to add colour in your work wardrobe if you have cool or warm colouring

Having worked in HR (Human Resources) for the past several years, I have noticed that most people avoid wearing colour at work like the plague and stick to the safe neutrals of black, navy, grey and white. While these colours are safe and professional, they often don’t suit people’s colouring, don’t showcase a persons dynamic side and aren’t that fun to wear. Before you rush out to buy a bright pink suit though, here are a few ways to make colour work for you for work and get noticed in a positive way!

1. The first thing I’m going to do is contradict what I just said and advise you to build your work wardrobe around your best neutrals. These best neutrals should work with your natural colouring e.g. For someone with cool, muted colouring your best neutrals are grey, navy and a rose beige or rose brown. A warm person would do well with navy, olive green or chocolate brown. Start by working out what your best neutrals are.

yves-saint-laurent-rive-gauche-black-womens-suit-product-1-12179013-676538408
Professional but not terribly dynamic.

2. Wear a medium to high level of contrast in your clothes so that you look dynamic and so that you don’t fade into the background. This contrast level can be achieved by wearing a darker colour and a lighter colour together. This is traditionally why combinations such as black and white or navy and white have worked so well. Again an example; I look more dynamic when I wear a navy suit and an offwhite top (white makes me looked washed out and tired) rather than lower contrast combinations such as beige and grey. For warm toned people, try dark olives and cream or chocolate brown and cream.

3. You can also introduce contrast by combining a dark colour with a bright colour. You can do this safely by adding a dash of colour inside your jacket or cardigan or by wearing a bright complimentary scarf. Keep jewellery to a minimum and opt for quality pieces in silver or gold. Unless you work in a creative job, dangly earrings and the like will not create the professional presentation you are aiming for.

Red and black suit

4. If you are more confident, then try wearing a bright jacket with a contrasting dark tailored pants. You can express more of your personality this way and still remain professional.

5. Colour psychology is a huge topic and it is well-known that colour affects our moods. Keep a few simple ideas in mind when choosing colour. Go easy with red; while it is a great colour, it can be seen as a bit hostile in the work environment as it is associated with power and aggression – Not hugely desirable for team building activities unless you are the CEO. Grey worn from head to toe can also be a bit of a faux pas as it is seen as quite passive, not an ideal trait in most work environments. Blue is one of the best colours to wear to the office and is seen as friendly and trust worthy. Green is also perfect as it evokes freshness and harmony and hands up who doesn’t want more of this at work??

 

Upcoming Event – The Tonal Taster Workshop 16th November

andrii-podilnyk-1077945-unsplash.jpgThis workshop is a pared down taster into the world of Colour Analysis- there are six tones that apply to all of the colour analysis seasons – Warm, Cool, Soft-Muted, Bright, Light & Deep, which means we are all at least one of these tonal groups. Depending on your skin, hair & eye colour, you suit one tone. If for example you are ‘Warm’…… wearing ‘Cool’ colours will make you look less than your best and even washed out.

You will come away knowing the tone of colour that works for you and an array of colours that work for you right now.

You will be able to order a tonal colour swatch during the session with colours that work for you.

Date/Time: 16th November 9.30-11.30am

Venue: La Lune the Mougins, 1082 Avenue General De Gaulle, 06250, Mougins.

Cost: €25/ person – Can be redeemed against cost of full colour consultation if booked during workshop.

Please bring an item of clothing in a colour that suits you and one that you are not sure about.

Book & Pay Here

The Quest For The Perfect Boots

I am currently on the quest to find the perfect pair of boots to add to my autumn/ winter wardrobe. I have visited all the shops in Antibes and Cannes but have come up short. You see, my requirement is very exact as I really think about each new addition to my wardrobe. It kills me to add something that I won’t wear because of the space it takes up, the cost and just the waste of time and effort required to invest in something that doesn’t work.

So what is this holy grail that I am looking for?

Well, they need to be leather as suede just wont cut it in rainy winter, I want a grey/taupe colour (This colour works well with my hair colour/ wardrobe), they must have a comfortable heel and I’m looking for a mid-length style that I can wear with my shorter slim pants and jeans. I am looking for a refined style that will add some formality to my outfits as currently I have way too many casual clothes! I found the perfect pair online, see picture, but I am reluctant to buy them as I would prefer to try them on as comfort is a huge thing for me. Have you seen them or a pair like them?

So you may ask at this stage, what is the point of this article?? The point I’m making here is that planning goes a long way. To save time, effort and energy, you should first clearly define what you are looking for and your chances of finding it are so much greater. What boots are you adding to your wardrobe for Autumn/ Winter and what are your criteria – What colour, what material, what length, what style, what do they need to work with in your current wardrobe? When you answer these questions, you narrow your search and your laser like focus is sure to get you the perfect pair of boots without expending too much energy:) Do let me know how you get on.

Do you know your personal colour contrast value?

When I discovered the colours that suited me best, I initially went a bit crazy wearing lots of combinations of colours together. The colours were right for my skintone but somehow, the combination didn’t work well for me. However, I did observe that lots of people looked great wearing several colours together. The reason for this is related to our colour contrast value. If you have a high colour contrast, you look great in lots of colour and conversely if you have a low colour contrast you look better wearing a monochromatic look or one colour in different tints, tones and shades. So how do you work out what your colour contrast value is? You need to figure out if your hair, eyes and skin are coloured or neutral. This table will help you:

1.       Hair Colour All cool browns, All Cool Blonds, Platinum, White, Black Neutral
Warm Browns, Warm Blondes, Strawberry Blond, Red, Copper, Purple, Violet Etc. Coloured
2.       Eye Colour Grey, Brown, Black Neutral
Blue, Green , Olive, Bronze Coloured
3.       Skin Clear, Colour ranges from light to medium beige, White, Deep Brown, Dark black Neutral
Red or Florid, Bronzed, Golden Coloured

The more colour you see in you skin, hair and eyes, the more colour you can wear. If you are all neutrals, you look best in neutral or monochromatic colours. If you have 1 colour then you will look best in 1 colour worn with neutrals. If you have 2 or 3 colours you will look fabulous wearing lots of colour.

Examples:

EMILY BLUNT photo

Neutral Hair (Ash Blond), Neutral Skin (Light Beige), Neutral Eyes (Grey) – Low Colour Contrast. Looks best in neutral colours and monochromatic looks (Different tints, tones and shades of the same colour)

Cameron Diaz

Coloured Hair (Strawberry Blond), Coloured Skin (Tan , A little Florid), Coloured Eyes (Bright Blue) – High Colour contrast. Looks great with lots of colours worn together or in multi-coloured prints.

Gillian Anderson

Coloured Hair (Red), Coloured Skin (Golden Beige), Neutral Eyes (Grey) – Medium Colour Contrast. Looks great with 2 colours worn with neutrals or 2 colours in prints worn with neutrals.

Kelly+Osbourne+Short+Hairstyles+Short+Side+B01tTPigMDaxkelly-osbourne-at-mac-collection-photocall-in-london_4.jpg

If you change your hair colour or skin colour (fake or real tan) or even your eye colour (contact lenses), needless to say you can easily change your colour contrast level. In the pictures above you can see that Kelly Osbourne went from a fairly low colour contrast  level to a much higher colour contrast level allowing her to wear more colour in her makeup and clothes.

I have only discussed colour contrast in this article. There is also your contrast value which also needs to be taken into consideration when putting an outfit together. For example even though Kelly Osbourne is a low colour contrast in the first picture, her contrast value is high as her skin tone is very light and her hair colour is very dark. This means she looks best in high contrast combinations of neutral colours like black and white but does best to stick to 1 colour such as red.

Can you work out your colour contrast level? Send me a picture if you are still struggling and I can help you with this.